White to Blue Belt – Taking the Mount Position from the Headlock Defense, Freeing the Head and Going for the Arm Bar

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9 Comments

  1. Kenneth C March 14, 2018 at 3:01 pm

    Really nice details of the forearm on the neck with body weight pressure. I usually use the wrist bone to drive down.

  2. Colin B March 20, 2018 at 6:26 pm

    Sliding the shin and leg up against the opponent prior to initiating the step over, while allowing for a more efficient step over was a great “nugget” that I got from this video. The details on hand placement and leg movement for the facilitation of the arm was another detail I have missed in the past.

    • Nathan A January 2, 2020 at 9:20 am

      I knew going over the head vs. straight up was more effective, and I like the shift you made that it’s more about pressing down than lifting up, and the biomechanical alignment cue. Also the head/hip movement to free the arm and step the leg over. 🔥

  3. Cesar O September 5, 2018 at 8:05 am

    Excellent details. Question? What is the best way to prevent my opponent from biting either my forearm or leg? I deal with a lot of EDP’s, once they get caught or trapped, there immediate attempt is to scratch and bite.

    • Henry A October 1, 2018 at 7:00 pm

      Biting can definitely be a factor and if that’s something your worried about when you place your hand in front of their face, turn their face down using your palm against their cheek. If your worried about them biting your leg, then don’t pass your leg over the their face, use your knee by their head instead. The only issue with this option is that unless you are extremely tight with pinching your knees together they can sometimes sit up out of the armlock. Also if biting is a constant issue, I tend to not go for armlock when mounted, I would probably set up a gift wrap for control instead, that way i have the option to use strikes and take the back

  4. Jeff C January 5, 2019 at 7:48 am

    love the details! thanks.

  5. Nathan A January 2, 2020 at 9:20 am

    I knew going over the head vs. straight up was more effective, and I like the shift you made that it’s more about pressing down than lifting up, and the biomechanical alignment cue. Also the head/hip movement to free the arm and step the leg over. 🔥

  6. Trond H May 19, 2020 at 1:10 pm

    When we’re spinning around the head, is there any reason why we shouldn’t plant our hand on the side of the face of the opponent to get higher?

    Doing this seems to have a few advantages:
    1. I don’t really need to twist towards the feet so much as I’m higher up.. This is one movement less, saves time and energy.
    2. Opponent is squished to the floor.
    3. I don’t need to put so much weight forwards. Seems to me there’s less of a chance losing balance/being pushed over by the opponent. Also time saving not needing to lean forwards.
    4. As long as your hand is on the side of the opponent’s face and not across the mouth I think it’s harder for the opponent to bite, as opposed to putting the whole arm just in front of the mouth.

    Is this something Henry would recommend doing, or does this method have some kind of drawback besides obviously making your training partner more uncomfortable?

  7. Trond H May 21, 2020 at 12:47 pm

    What I personally find really helpful is when I slide the first foot in to the back of the opponent, that my foot stands at the balls of the feet.
    Makes me able to put a lot more pressure on the neck by slightly lifting my knee off the ground without sacrificing balance.

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